Ohop Groundbreaking Celebration

This past Saturday, the Nisqually Land Trust, with support from the Nisqually Indian Tribe and South Puget Sound Salmon Enhancement Group, hosted a celebratory groundbreaking event at the site of the new Ohop Creek restoration. The day started with a visit to past restoration sites, where guests saw the meandering creek and thriving tree saplings. It painted the perfect picture of what the new site will look like!

Guests then traveled to Burwash Farm to enjoy views of the next phase, listen to speakers, eat freshly smoked salmon and celebrate as clumps of dirt were thrown from the what will be the new channel. Several generations of the Burwash family attended the event; without their support and enthusiasm for the project, this next phase wouldn’t be happening!

Mr. Burwash has lived and farmed in the Ohop Valley for ___ years. He and his family decided that preservation of the farm through conservation was a perfect way to carry on the family legacy. Photo credit: Emmett O'Connell
Steve Burwash has lived and farmed in the Ohop Valley for 4 generations. He and his family decided that preservation of the farm through conservation was a perfect way to carry on the family legacy. Photo credit: Emmett O’Connell
Jeanette Dorner, of the Puget Sound Partnership, recognized the importance of the Ohop Valley Restoration in the context of the Nisqually Watershed and the health of Puget Sound. Photo credit: Emmett O'Connell
Jeanette Dorner, of the Puget Sound Partnership, recognized the importance of the Ohop Valley Restoration in the context of the Nisqually Watershed and the overall health of Puget Sound. Photo credit: Emmett O’Connell
Steve Pruitt, long time Ohop Valley resident and member of the Nisqually River Council's Citizens Advisory Committee spoke about the role of connecting local people to their land. Photo credit: Emmett O'Connell
Steve Pruitt, long time Ohop Valley resident and member of the Nisqually River Council’s Citizens Advisory Committee spoke about the role of connecting local people to their land. Photo credit: Emmett O’Connell
The groundbreaking took place in the soon-to-be Ohop Creek channel. The new channel will be wider and shallower than the ditch it is currently in. This will form new habitats and will enhance salmon populations. Photo credit: Emmett O'Connell.
The groundbreaking took place in the soon-to-be Ohop Creek channel. The new channel will be wider and shallower than the ditch it is currently in. This will form new habitats and will enhance salmon populations. Photo credit: Emmett O’Connell.
Representing the youngest generation of the Burwash family, ___ throws dirt from the new creek bed. Photo credit: Emmett O'Connell
Matteus Rabel, the youngest generation of the Burwash family, throws dirt from the new creek bed. Photo credit: Emmett O’Connell
The Ohop Groundbreaking Celebration this Saturday marked the beginning of the newest phase of restoration. Photo credit: Emmett O'Connell
The Ohop Groundbreaking Celebration this Saturday marked the beginning of the newest phase of restoration. Photo credit: Emmett O’Connell
The restoration project has been a huge collaboration between many partners. It's impacts will not only be felt locally, but will also contribute to a healthier Puget Sound. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner
The restoration project has been a huge collaboration between many partners. It’s impacts will not only be felt locally, but will also contribute to a healthier Puget Sound. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner
As construction progresses, these logs will be placed in the stream bed to mimic large woody debris piles. The debris provides shelter for migrating salmon. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner
As construction progresses, these logs will be placed in the stream bed to mimic large woody debris piles. The debris provides shelter for migrating salmon. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner
The progress of construction was visible during the groundbreaking celebration. This picture shows a part of the new creek bed that the Ohop will soon flow through. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner
The progress of construction was visible during the groundbreaking celebration. This picture shows a part of the new creek bed that the Ohop will soon flow through. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner

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