First two restoration sections complete

As we roll into August, things in the Ohop Valley have continued to move along steadily. Construction of the new stream bed is complete in the first two sections, and crews are now starting work on the third section! That means equipment is already by the Burwash Farm!

Construction progress in the Ohop Valley. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner

Construction progress in the Ohop Valley. Photo credit: Kim Bredensteiner

This bend in the creek bed will provide a variety of water flows. The variation makes swimming easier on fish. Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

This bend in the creek bed will provide a variety of water flows. The variation makes swimming easier on fish. Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

With the first two restoration sections done, the equipment is getting closer to Burwash Farm! Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

With the first two restoration sections done, the equipment is getting closer to Burwash Farm! Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

The Burwash Farm is has been a part of the Ohop Valley for the better part of a century. Thanks to the Burwash Family and their commitment to the valley, the farm will have a lasting legacy and huge impact on salmon enhancement. To learn more about the Burwash Family, visit our previous post about the Ohop Groundbreaking Celebration! Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

The Burwash Farm is has been a part of the Ohop Valley for the better part of a century. Thanks to the Burwash Family and their commitment to the valley, the farm will have a lasting legacy and huge impact on salmon enhancement. To learn more about the Burwash Family, visit our previous post about the Ohop Groundbreaking Celebration! Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

The new stream bed is beginning to take shape! What a difference it's making: the twisting creek will provide much better habitat than the ditch in place previously. Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

The new stream bed is beginning to take shape! What a difference it’s making: the twisting creek will provide much better habitat than the ditch in place previously. Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

There's more to restoration than just re-meandering the creek. The construction crews are also installing Large Woody Debris (LWD) piles, designed to mimic the logs that fall naturally in mountain streams. These LWD piles provide excellent habitat for fish. Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

There’s more to restoration than just re-meandering the creek. The construction crews are also installing Large Woody Debris (LWD) piles, designed to mimic the logs that fall naturally in mountain streams. These LWD piles provide excellent habitat for fish. Photo: Kim Bredensteiner

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